Center for Global Health

MSC10-5550
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 272-8207
Fax: (505) 272-8441

Research Activities

There are a substantial number of local and global health research activities at UNM and at our international partner sites. One of the primary goals of the Center Program is to create an international network of research activities to address the current needs of communities in the local Southwest region of the United States and the global community. This approach allows us to focus on key health issues in representative geographic locations around the globe were we have well-funded research projects.

Child in Gabon

Child in Gabon

Research in Africa

The University of New Mexico has a number of activities in Africa, primarily focused in Kenya. These activities are aimed at defining the genetic and immunological basis of malarial anemia and the most common anemia-promoting co-infections in children with malaria in western Kenya: HIV-1 and bacteremia.

Pediatric Malaria, HIV-1, and Bacteremia Research in western Kenya
Directed by Dr. DJ Perkins. This project is focusing on pediatric infectious diseases in western Kenya.

Schistosomiasis Research in Kenya
Directed by Dr. Sam Loker. This project, located in western Kenya, is focused on the development of novel molecular tools to investigate the epidemiology of schistosomiasis in and around Lake Victoria.

Sandfly

Sandfly, primary vector of
leishmaniasis.

Research in Asia

The University of New Mexico has a number of activities in India, including collaborations with Rajendra Memorial Research Institute (RMRI) in Patna and Saurashtra University in Rajkot, Gujarat State. A description of these activities are listed below:

Kala Azar Research In India
Dr. Ravi Durvasula has extensive activities in India investigating the leishmaniases, a group of sandfly-mediated parasitic diseases and a leading cause of mortality in the world.

Research in Central and South America

The University of New Mexico has a number of research activities in Central and South America focusing on hantavirus, Chagas disease, medical anthropology, tuberculosis, and telemedicine.

Sin Nombre virus

Transmission electron micrograph
of Sin Nombre virus.

Hantavirus Research in Chile and Panama
Projects directed by Dr. Greg Mertz  focus on hantaviruses research and training activities in Chile and Panama.

Chagas Disease in Central and South America
These projects are investigating Chagas disease in Guatemala, Brazil, and Argentina. Directed by Dr. Ravi Durvasula.

Anthropological and Medical Research in Bolivia
These anthropological projects focus on health in indigenous populations in Bolivia. Directed by Dr. Hilly Kaplan.

Tuberculosis Research in South America
A number of projects, directed by Dr. Marcos Burgos and Dr. Vojo Deretic,  are investigating tuberculosis in South America.


Several sites in South America are actively engaged in telemedicine projects directed by Dr. Dale Alverson. See the Center for Telehealth and Cybermedicine Research (CfTH)

Anthropological and medical research in Bolivia

Children living in a Tsimane village along the Maniqui River in Bolivia

Children living in a Tsimane village along the
Maniqui River in Bolivia

The University of New Mexico has a field research site in lowland Bolivia among Tsimane native South Americans.  These activities, directed by Dr. Hillard Kaplan, are highlighted below:

  • The Tsimane project is an integrated anthropological and medical research program that has been funded by the NIH and NSF over the last five years, with at least seven more years of longitudinal data collection anticipated. Currently, the project is working in 26 Tsimane villages with a team of greater than 30 researchers from Bolivia and the US investigating heart and kidney disease, hypertension, immune function, infectious diseases, and exercise and diet over the life course.
  • This project will offer trainees the opportunity to learn about the special problems confronted by native peoples, and health in a highly infectious environment in the context of an interdisciplinary and international research project.
  •  Read a complete description of the UNM-UCSB Tsimane Health and Life History Project