Center for Occupational Environmental Health Promotion

MSC 10-5550
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Physical Location:
Family Practice Center
2400 Tucker NE

Phone: (505) 272-8043
Fax: (505) 272-8044

UNM HEaRT (Heart Emergency and Rescue Training)

The outcome of many medical emergencies can be improved by early care from a trained bystander. At work, injuries and illnesses kill about 2.2 million people in the world each year. Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death in the United States of America for individuals younger than 44 years of age. On average, 15 workers die each day in the USA from traumatic injuries, and more than 4 million workers suffer a nonfatal injury or illness each year.

In the USA, about 1⁄3 of all injuries and 20% of injury deaths occur at home. For every home injury death there are about 650 nonfatal home injuries. Safe practices at work, home, and play can prevent many injuries, illnesses, and deaths. However, once injury or sudden illness has occurred, effective first aid can make the difference between:

  • Rapid or prolonged recovery
  • Temporary or permanent disability
  • Life or death

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, defines first aid as “emergency care provided for injury or sudden illness before professional emergency medical treatment becomes available. A first aid provider is someone trained in the delivery of initial emergency procedures and using limited equipment to perform a primary assessment and intervention until Emergency Medical Services, or EMS, personnel arrive.

The essential responsibilities of a first aid provider are:

  • Recognizing a medical emergency,
  • Making the decision to help,
  • Identifying hazards and ensuring personal safety,
  • Activating the EMS system,
  • Providing supportive, basic first aid care.

The goal of first aid training is to help a provider gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence necessary to manage a medical emergency until more advanced help is available. First aid does not require making complex decisions or having in-depth medical knowledge. It is easy to learn, remember, and perform.

Course Offerings

Adult/Infant/Child CPR/AED First Aid Training - (Two Year Certification)

Reason for Learning - Is to train lay rescuers to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults, children, and infants.

The purpose of the CPR/AED program is to train lay rescuers to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults, children and infants until more advanced medical personnel take over. This program is a combined CPR and AED program designed specifically for laypeople. The program is an excellent choice for both the community and workplace setting.

Blood Borne Pathogens

NOTE: Schedule by request only. For more information please contact us at (505) 272-8364 or HSC-AED@salud.unm.edu

Core Learning Objectives

You will learn:

  • What are blood borne pathogens?
  • How infection occurs.
  • Specific blood borne pathogens
  • Transmission
  • Exposure
  • Housekeeping
  • Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • What do you do if an exposure occurs?
  • Personal protective equipment

CPR/AED Sudden Cardiac Arrest and Early Defibrillation

Reason for Learning - Rapid response to a collapsed person from sudden cardiac arrest increases the likelihood of a successful outcome.

The outcome of many medical emergencies can be improved by early care from a trained bystander.

Core Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this training program, a student will be able to describe how to recognize and provide first aid treatment for sudden cardiac arrest.

Sudden cardiac arrest, or SCA, can occur without warning to anyone, at any time. It is one of the leading causes of death among adults in the United States. Sudden cardiac arrest happens when the normal electrical impulses in the heart unexpectedly become disorganized. Blood flow to the brain and body abruptly stops. The lack of blood and oxygen to the brain causes the person to quickly lose consciousness, collapse, and stop breathing.

Brain tissue is especially sensitive to a lack of oxygen. When oxygen is cut off, brain death can occur quickly, within a matter of minutes. Without early recognition and care from a bystander, the person will not survive. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, allows a bystander to restore some oxygen to the brain through a combination of chest compressions and rescue breaths. By itself, CPR is only a temporary measure that can buy time until more advanced care can be provided.

The most effective treatment for ventricular fibrillation is defibrillation. To defibrillate, electrode pads are applied to the chest and an electrical shock is sent between the pads through the heart. This shock stops ventricular fibrillation, so the heart’s normal electrical activity can return and restore blood flow.

An automated external defibrillator, or AED, is a small, portable, computerized device that is simple for a minimally trained bystander to operate. Immediate, high-quality CPR and defibrillation with an AED from a bystander can double or even triple the chance for survival. 

CPR - Sudden Cardiac Arrest and Early Defibrillation

Reason for Learning - Rapid response to a collapsed person from sudden cardiac arrest increases the likelihood of a successful outcome.

Core Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this training program, a student will be able to describe how to recognize and provide first aid treatment for sudden cardiac arrest.

Sudden cardiac arrest, or SCA, can occur without warning to anyone, at any time. It is one of the leading causes of death among adults in the United States. Sudden cardiac arrest happens when the normal electrical impulses in the heart unexpectedly become disorganized. Blood flow to the brain and body abruptly stops. The lack of blood and oxygen to the brain causes the person to quickly lose consciousness, collapse, and stop breathing.

Brain tissue is especially sensitive to a lack of oxygen. When oxygen is cut off, brain death can occur quickly, within a matter of minutes. Without early recognition and care from a bystander, the person will not survive. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, allows a bystander to restore some oxygen to the brain through a combination of chest compressions and rescue breaths. By itself, CPR is only a temporary measure that can buy time until more advanced care can be provided.

The most effective treatment for ventricular fibrillation is defibrillation. To defibrillate, electrode pads are applied to the chest and an electrical shock is sent between the pads through the heart. This shock stops ventricular fibrillation, so the heart’s normal electrical activity can return and restore blood flow. An automated external defibrillator, or AED, is a small, portable, computerized device that is simple for a minimally trained bystander to operate. Immediate, high-quality CPR and defibrillation with an AED from a bystander can double or even triple the chance for survival.

C-PRO Training for Professionals - (Two Year Certification)

Reason for Learning - Recognizing a patient who is choking and responding with the appropriate care is a simple and effective skill for a provider to learn.

Core Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this training program, a student will be able to describe how to recognize and provide treatment for choking of adults, children, and infants.

  1. Demonstrate one-rescuer adult, child, and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a manikin, and how to use an AED.
  2. Demonstrate two-rescuer adult, child and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a manikin.
  3. Simulate the treatment of:
    1. A conscious adult or child with an obstructed airway
    2. Complications; a pregnant woman and person who is obese
  4. Demonstrate the treatment of a conscious infant with an obstructed airway on a manikin.
  5. Simulate the treatment of an unconscious adult, child, or infant with an obstructed airway.
  6. Demonstrate the use of various breathing tools, such as masks, and bag-valve masks.

Project Heart Start: Hands-Only or Compression-Only CPR

NOTE: Class offered by request only. For more information please contact us at (505) 272-8364 or AED@salud.unm.edu

A Project Heart Start training session lasts only about 50 minutes and is divided into watching a 12 minute video produced by KOAT and Dr. Barry Ramo, followed by skill sessions led by a trainer. The participant will learn to: assess a victim of Sudden Cardiac Arrest, call 911, correctly perform chest compressions, recognize the signs of a heart attack, save someone who is choking and how to use an AED.

Re-Certification Training - (Two Year Certification)

Review of the following: Sudden Cardiac Arrest and Early Defibrillation

Reason for Learning - Rapid response to a collapsed person from sudden cardiac arrest increases the likelihood of a successful outcome.

Core Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this training program, a student will be able to describe how to recognize and provide first aid treatment for sudden cardiac arrest.

Sudden cardiac arrest, or SCA, can occur without warning to anyone, at any time. It is one of the leading causes of death among adults in the United States. Sudden cardiac arrest happens when the normal electrical impulses in the heart unexpectedly become disorganized. Blood flow to the brain and body abruptly stops. The lack of blood and oxygen to the brain causes the person to quickly lose consciousness, collapse, and stop breathing. Brain tissue is especially sensitive to a lack of oxygen. When oxygen is cut off, brain death can occur quickly, within a matter of minutes. Without early recognition and care from a bystander, the person will not survive. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, allows a bystander to restore some oxygen to the brain through a combination of chest compressions and rescue breaths. By itself, CPR is only a temporary measure that can buy time until more advanced care can be provided.

The most effective treatment for ventricular fibrillation is defibrillation. To defibrillate, electrode pads are applied to the chest and an electrical shock is sent between the pads through the heart. This shock stops ventricular fibrillation, so the heart’s normal electrical activity can return and restore blood flow. An automated external defibrillator, or AED, is a small, portable, computerized device that is simple for a minimally trained bystander to operate. Immediate, high-quality CPR and defibrillation with an AED from a bystander can double or even triple the chance for survival.