Scholarly Activity Project

Jon Danaraj presenting at ACP, Betty Chang facilitating
Jon Danaraj presenting at ACP, Betty Chang facilitating

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Department of Internal Medicine require that all categorical internal medicine residents complete a scholarly activity in order to finish residency training.

Education: This requirement is intended to enhance the house officer's understanding of a clinical area and/or research methodology, including design, implementation, interpretation, and presentation of results.

Location: There are no restrictions regarding the location of your project.

Presentation: The activity is expected to result in a presentation at a regional or national meeting, and/or a paper for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

All house officers will be required to present the results of their project in the form of a poster or oral presentation and/or written manuscript. This presentation could be at the annual regional meetings of the American College of Physicians or the Mountain West Society of General Internal Medicine, the Carmel meeting, or at a national meeting.

Time Management: The research project can take place at any time during the residency in blocks of time of one month, serial months, or concurrently with regular clinical rotations. Up to 3 months could be granted for a well designed project. The house officer is still responsible for any regularly scheduled patient care requirements such as continuity clinics, even if a block of time is used for the project.

Award at the Annual Housestaff Dinner: Each year a house officer who has done an exceptional job on a project is awarded the excellence in research award. Mentors are solicited to write letters of support for the award.

Mentors and More Help

View the mentors tab on this page for a list of mentors.

Also, you can contact any of the committee 
members or IM Residency administration staff for help.

Committee for house officer scholarly activity

All house officers will be required to present the results of their project in the form of a poster or oral presentation and/or written manuscript. This presentation could be at the annual regional meetings of the American College of Physicians or the Mountain West Society of General Internal Medicine, the Carmel meeting, or at a national meeting.

Time Management: The research project can take place at any time during the residency in blocks of time of one month, serial months, or concurrently with regular clinical rotations. Up to 3 months could be granted for a well designed project. The house officer is still responsible for any regularly scheduled patient care requirements such as continuity clinics, even if a block of time is used for the project.

Award at the Annual Housestaff Dinner: Each year a house officer who has done an exceptional job on a project is awarded the excellence in research award. Mentors are solicited to write letters of support for the award.

These resources can be found in the fourth floor book collection of the Health Sciences Library and Informatics Center (HSLIC)

HSLIC

Research Design References

  • DePoy, E. Introduction to research : Understanding and applying multiple strategies (2nd ed.). St. Louis : Mosby c1999. W20.5 D422 1999
  • Hulley, S. B. Designing clinical research (3rd ed.). Philadelphia PA : Lippincott Williams & Wilkins c2007. WA 950 D46 2007
  • Katz, M. Study design and statistical analysis : A practical guide for clinicians. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press 2006. WA 950 K39 2006
  • Kumar, R. Research methodology : A step--step guide for beginners (2nd ed.). London : SAGE 2005. Q 180.55 M4 K86 2005
  • Laake, P., Benestad, H. B., & Olsen, B. R. Research methodology in the medical and biological sciences. Amsterdam ; Boston ; London : Academic c2007. QH 315 R47; 2007
  • Methodological issues & strategies in clinical research (3rd ed.). Washington DC : American Psychological Association c2003. WM 105 M5925 2003
  • Niebauer, J. The clinical research survival guide. London : REMEDICA c2002.
  • Qualitative research in health care. London ; Philadelphia PA : Whurr 2004. W84.3 Q1 2004
  • Users' guides to the medical literature : A manual for evidence-based clinical practice. Chicago IL : AMA Press c2008. WB 39 U845 2008
  • Valiela, I. Doing science : Design, analysis, and communication of scientific research. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press 2001. Q 180 V35 2001

Statistics Books

  • Byrne, D. Interpreting quantitative data. London ; Thousand Oaks Calif. : SAGE 2002.  HA 35 B995 2002
  • Campbell, M. J.,PhD. Medical statistics : A commonsense approach (3rd ed.). Chichester England ; New York : J. Wiley 1999. WA950 C189 1999
  • Ewens, W., & Grant, G. Statistical methods in bioinformatics : An introduction. New York : Springer 2001. WA 950 E94 2001
  • Glaser, A. N. High-yield biostatistics (3rd ed.). Philadelphia : Lippincott Williams & Wilkins c2005. W 18.2 H63 B616 2005
  • Harris, M., & Taylor, G. Medical statistics made easy 2 (2nd ed.). Bloxham Oxfordshire : Scion 2008. WA 950 P66 2008
  • Kranzler, G., & Moursund, J. Statistics for the terrified (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River N.J. : Prentice Hall c1999. QA 276.12 K73 1999
  • Peat, J., Barton, B., & Bland, f. M. Medical statistics : A guide to data analysis and critical appraisal (1st ed.). Malden Mass. : Blackwell Pub. c2005. WA 950 P363 2005
  • Petrie, A. Medical statistics at a glance. Oxford; Malden MA : Blackwell Science 2000. WA 950 P495 2000
  • Riffenburgh, R. H. Statistics in medicine (2nd ed.). Burlington MA : Elsevier Academic Press c2006. WA 950 E564 2000
  • Salkind, N. J. Statistics for people who (think they) hate statistics. Thousand Oaks Calif. : Sage Publications Inc. c2000. HA 29 S2365 2000

Endocrinology

David Schade

David Schade, MD

  • GCRC protocols could involve residents for clinical research experience

Epidemiology

Marianne Berwick

Marianne Berwick, PhD

  • Melanoma datasets that residents can help review. Several pilot studies that could use some assistance. Some are lab based and some are more population based.
  • Case-Control Study of Melanoma in Connecticut.
  • In this population-based study of 650 individuals newly diagnosed with melanoma and 549 control subjects recruited from the general population, we will be making many comparisons. One important comparison is for the risk factors for “aggressive” melanoma. We will have 20 year follow up and so this should be a publishable paper.


General Medicine

George Comerci

George Comerci, MD

  • Case series of bronchospasm relief with baclofen use.
Qaseem

Sandra Qaseem, MD

  • Projects related to home care in geriatrics. Based on quality improvement through chart review and also quality of communication and accessibility of care.

Hematology/Oncology

Melanie E Royce

Melanie E Royce, MD, PhD

  • Breast cancer, focused primarily on clinical aspects including drug development and clinical trial, also working closely with basic scientist and epidemiologist so those interested in such projects can have the opportunity of pursuing them as well in collaboration with these folks.

Hospital Medicine

Kendall Rogers

Kendall Rogers, MD

  • Quality improvement is an emerging realm of research and there is ample healthcare processes in need of change. All physicians should have experience in the science of process improvement which they will use throughout their careers. The hospitalist group is involved in numerous direct patient care PDSA (Plan/Do/Study/Act) projects all appropriate for resident/student involvement with definable goals and realistic time-lines. Many projects available including doing analysis of existing hospital data on already implemented projects (inpatient glycemic control, VTE prophylaxis, care transitions, patient satisfaction, ect.) There are also many projects in development around hand-offs, nurse/MD communication, resident/staff schedules, EMR implementation. Also willing to mentor (or find mentors) for students on any projects related to inpatient medicine, will guide you through PDSA cycles. Will help you define a problem and analyze the current system (PLAN), develop an intervention and implement it on a small scale (DO), measure the results of the intervention (STUDY), and then act on this information to revise the intervention and re-implement on a larger scale and start the cycle over again.

Gastroenterology/Hepatology

Thomas Ma

Thomas Ma, MD, PhD

  • Basic science: Intestinal epithelial permeability studies
Henry Lin

Henry Lin, MD

  • The role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth on different disease states such as fibromyalgia.

Infectious Diseases

Marcos Burgos

Marcos Burgos, MD

  • Medical director of the tuberculosis control program in NM and research in tuberculosis in general.
  • There are 3 areas of research: Molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis, Clinical management of tuberculosis, and International rotation for the management of tuberculosis/HIV co-infection in Peru.
Susan Kellie

Susan Kellie, MD

  • Molecular epidemiology techniques in lab
  • Help them with an ID poster/case report for the ACP
Ravi Druvasala

Ravi Druvasala, MD

  • Many projects involving paratransgenesis and treatments for Chaga’s disease.

Pulmonary/Critical Care

Michel Boivin

Michel Boivin, MD

  • Cytokines and increased intestinal permeability in ICU patients (clinical research project with T Ma)
  • Increased intestinal Permeability in ESRD patients (clinical research project with T Ma)
  • Cytokine regulation of intestinal epithelial monolayers (basic science project with T. Ma).
  • The clinical projects include the recruitment and evaluation of study patients, both healthy volunteers and patients. No research experience required. The basic projects involve lab work with cell culture models, some prior experience working in a lab would be necessary given the short time frame. Previous residents working with our group have all published posters and or papers.
  • Use of ultrasound in Critical Illness
Akshay Sood

Akshay Sood, MD, MPH

  • Project Name: Adiposity, Activity and Asthma - A Clinical Translational Study. Objective: This study evaluates the effect of various obesity phenotypes and physical activity status on inflammatory and oxidant stress markers of asthma

Sleep Medicine

No photo available

Frank Ralls, MD

  • Projects include understanding the relationship of sleep deprivation and sleep apnea with associated medical morbidities and mortality, and Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep without atonia in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s Disease.

Patrick Rendon giving a presentation to the Interns
Patrick Rendon giving a presentation to the Interns

General Support: The Office of Research or a CHOSA committee member can assist the resident with identifying a mentor or collaborator, obtaining statistical or other required support services, and obtaining funds for research supplies, travel, and other expenses.

Approvals: All projects need to be approved by the Committee for House Officer Scholarly Activity (CHOSA). Research elective requests must also be approved by the residency program. You can't start a research elective until all forms are in place.

  • Case presentation (clinical vignette)
  • Quality improvement initiative
  • Educational project
  • Retrospective study to answer a clinical question
  • Basic science laboratory study
  • Database analysis
  • Survey
  • Clinical trial
  • Pilot study
  • Completing a project begun before residency
  • Presenting results or preparing a manuscript for a project performed before residency
  • Working with a faculty investigator on an existing project

Forms

See the Human Research Protections Office 
for forms involving human subjects

Timeline Suggestion

Year 1

  • Identify an advisor/mentor
  • Identify a scholarly project/activity
  • Develop and submit a project outline to mentor
  • Download the forms for approval and signatures
  • Library Consult to help with design, review prior to project

Year 2

  • Perform the project once approvals are in place

Year 3

  • Present or submit the project for publication

HSLIC public computing
HSLIC public computing

Clinical Services librarian Sarah Morley is available for individual consultation on your project. Contact her via email smorley@salud.unm.edu or by phone 272-3773 to set up an appointment.

Databases

Links to full text material are available when you access databases through HSliC or University libraries websites. Offsite access to licensed material requires your UserName and Password.

http://hsc.unm.edu/library/databases.shtml
  • Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - A collection of EBM databases
  • PubMed - Citations and abstracts in medicine, nursing, dentistry, health care systems, life sciences
  • PsycINFO - Citations and summaries of journal articles, book chapters, books, dissertations, and technical reports in psychology
  • Web of Science - Includes Science Citation Index which allows for searching by subject and cite authors.
http://elibrary.unm.edu/find/databases.php

University libraries has a host of databases covering a wide array of topics that may be useful to you: Education , Health Policy, Law, Nutrition, Psychology, Sociology, and Tests& Measurement.

Use the subject guide to help you determine which database to search. A few examples :

  • ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) - journal articles and reports in education
  • Health & Safety Science Abstracts - covers occupational health & safety, natural disasters and emergency management, medical safety, disease, injuries, and trauma
  • PsycArticles - full text articles from over 40 journals covering general psychology and specialized basic, applied, clinical, and theoretical research in psychology.

Managing Your References

Using an online citation management software program such as RefWorks™ or EndNote™ allows you to gather, manage and store your research resources. You will be able to create a personal database of references, generate bibliographies and in-text citations using a wide array of formats including journal specific formats. The HSliC licenses the RefWorks™ product for HSC faculty, staff, and students. Individuals must sign up for an account while on the HSC campus but once the account has been set up you may use the product anywhere. Find the link to RefWorks™ on the HSliC All Databases web page.

Publishing Your Work

ACP presenters
Mariam Salas, Neda Bader, Jon Danaraj
and Khaldoon Khirfan after presenting at ACP

Instructions for Authors in the Health Sciences: one stop shopping list of the instructions to authors for over 3,500 health and life sciences journals.

Retaining Your Copyright: Don’t assume you own the rights to your intellectual property! Use the following resources to help you keep all or partial rights to your work.

  • SHERPA/RoMEO: a clearinghouse of publisher’s copyright policies that will give you an idea of what your rights are with a particular publisher. http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/index.html
  • Before you submit your article for publication, look here for guidance on how to create an addendum to the publishing agreement. http://www.arl.org/sparc/author/

Regional Meetings

To Present Your Work

DSpace™ UNM https://repository.unm.edu/dspace/community-list: DSpace UNM is a university-based institutional repository for online digital content. Research material and scholarly publications (e.g., papers, posters, articles, images, etc.) posted on this website are freely available to anyone. Before posting content to this site, check the SHERPA/RoMEO site or any publishing agreements you or your co-authors have signed.

Scholarly Communication & NIH Policy Initiative: Here you will find information on the NIH Open Access policy and an interactive guide to help you work through the requirements. http://hsc.unm.edu/library/SCI/

Additional Resources

Tsao, C.I. & Roberts, L.W. (2009). Authorship in scholarly manuscripts: Practical considerations for resident and early career physicians. Academic Psychiatry, 33, 76-79.